WRCPC hosts Canadian Municipal Network on Crime Prevention for national event

Posted on: April 5th, 2017 By: Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council

On March 30th and 31st 2017, the Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council hosted the 2017 Canadian Municipal Network on Crime Prevention (CMNCP) at the Walper Hotel. During this two-day event, members of the network, representing 24 different municipalities across the nation, attended interactive lectures led by leaders in public engagement, mental health, and community development. They participated in round table discussions pertaining to increasing both the capacity for crime prevention as a whole and the CMNCP capacity.

Attendees also had the chance to network with other members regarding their experiences with crime prevention in their own municipalities. It was a pleasure to host this hardworking group here in Waterloo Region. We look forward to the continued work ahead!

The attending CMNCP members at the reception held at the Waterloo Region Museum.

The attending CMNCP members at the reception hosted by Waterloo Region Chair, Ken Seiling. -Waterloo Region Museum.

A few additional photos of the event proceedings

The CMNCP National Meeting was kicked off with an Indigenous Welcome

The CMNCP National Meeting was kicked off with an Indigenous Welcome & land Acknowledgement by Darren Thomas

 

Don Lenihan Presentation

Presentation & Dialogue with Don Lenihan on Public Engagement with Government & Community

Professor Irvin Waller from the University of Ottawa speaking during the CMNCP national meeting

Professor Irvin Waller from the University of Ottawa speaking during the CMNCP national meeting

Members of the CMNCP listening intently to a presentation.

Members of the CMNCP listening intently to a presentation.

Felix Munger of the CMNCP speaking at the national meeting

Felix Munger had the distinguished task of keeping the CMNCP proceedings on schedule!

Juma Assiago addresses the group

We were very pleased to host Juma Assiago from the UN- Habitat program at CMNCP. Juma supports international cities wanting to address complex crime issues through ‘safe city’ initiatives.

As this was a national meeting, all proceedings were delivered via simultaneous translation

Joe Mencini from the Working Centre explaining the ins-and-outs of the community agency

Joe Mencini from the Working Centre explaining the ins-and-outs of the community agency

field trip to The Working Centre

The group gets to leave the meeting table for a field trip to The Working Centre

Tour of the Working Centre & Queen Street. downtown Kitchener

The group gets to leave the meeting table for a field trip to The Working Centre

Members of the CMNCP listening to the history of the jail.

Members of the CMNCP make a visit to the WRCPC office & historic goal in downtown Kitchener

Chief Bryan Larkin of the Waterloo Region Police Services speaking at the Gaol

Chief Bryan Larkin of the Waterloo Region Police Services speaking at the Gaol

Regional Chair Ken Seiling addresses the guests at CMNCP reception held at the Waterloo Region Museum

Regional Chair Ken Seiling was the host for the CMNCP reception held at the Waterloo

Patrice Allard speaking at the reception.

CMNCP Co-Chair Patrice Allard speaking at the reception.

Deputy Chief Kevin Thaler of the Waterloo Region Police Services giving a speech at the reception

Deputy Chief Kevin Thaler of the Waterloo Region Police Services giving a speech at the reception

CMNCP members gather around the podium at the Waterloo Region Museum to listen to the next speaker.

CMNCP members gather around the podium at the Waterloo Region Museum for a welcome address.

WRCPC Chair Shayne Turner speaking to the guests at the reception

WRCPC Chair Shayne Turner speaking to the guests at the reception

Having a laugh at the reception

Dianne Hiese & Chris Cowie catching up at the reception

Hard at work during meeting sessions

Patrick Smith, CEO Canadian Mental Health Association

Patrick Smith delivers a presentation on the “Potential of Federated Organizations”

Prisons, Justice and Love: Turn the Page Book Club hosted by Friends of Crime Prevention

Posted on: November 16th, 2016 By: Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council

When you host a public book club, you just never know how things will unfold, much less when you host one with the title “Prisons, Justice and Love”! But we couldn’t have had a more engaging night if we had tried!

Friends of Crime Prevention were pleased to host the first ever “Turn the Page” Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen in November 2016. Scroll through the photos below for a short photo essay of the evening together with community partners, neighbours and Friends.

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

This is not my life by Diane Schoemperlen – our first book club selection for the Turn the Page Book Club focused on prisons, justice and love. A very entangled combination!

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

Friends of Crime Prevention, Jenn Robinson (middle) and Lisa Armstrong (right) were the most friendly greeters! Great to see so many new faces.

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

As people gathered for the evening, Friends of Crime Prevention had the opportunity to let us know why they are a Friend. Jeanean Thomas – because I care about my community

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

As people gathered for the evening, Friends of Crime Prevention had the opportunity to let us know why they are a Friend.
Pari Karem – Why not?!

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

Thanks to John and Wordsworth Books for bringing extra copies of Diane’s book for sale!

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

The inaugural Turn the Page Book Club was held at Fresh Ground, a new cafe & community space developed by The Working Centre.

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

48 people gather to hear Diane read from her new book “This is Not My Life: A Memoir of Love, Prison, and other Complications.

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

Diane reads the first line of the her book, a first line she is quite proud of! You’ll have to read the book to find out why this line still makes her laugh! Or listen to her interview with The Current on CBC Radio where the host reads it out loud.

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

Diane reading some of the more emotionally challenging parts from her book.

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

People came prepared! Many had read the book and had very insightful questions. Others came because of the topic, but bought the book by the end of the night!

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

In addition to a talk and reading by Diane, we invited additional panel members from the community & beyond to complement the discussion of prisons, justice, stigma and relationships. From left: Mike Farwell, Moderator; Diane Schoemperlen, Author; Jen Hutton, Women’s Crisis Services Waterloo Region, Shannon Moroney, Author of Through the Glass; Chris Cowie, ED Community Justice Initiatives

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

A very intent and listening audience!

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

Chris Cowie from Community Justice Initiatives shared about the agency’s Restorative Justice mandate and how a more restorative process in prisons could help in countless ways i.e. better integration into society upon release, deeper understanding of the nature of offending, development of new skills to deal with conflict. Teaching and using restorative justice early can also be a prevention tool.

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

With all the new faces in the audience, it was a great opportunity for many to learn about w hat it means to be a Friend of Crime Prevention!

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

It only take a few minutes to become a Friend of Crime Prevention – just like Jen Hutton!

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

Both Diane and Shannon took time to sign books for anyone who wanted. Also a chance for great conversations.

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

Diane and Shannon proudly display their “I am a Friend” buttons. Diane and Shannon were made honorary Friends and join Howard Sapers and Sir Neville, a guide dog, as Honorary Friends of Crime Prevention.

Turn the Page Book Club with Diane Schoemperlen

It was very special to have Shannon and Dianne together in the same evening. Shannon acted as a mentor to Diane during the writing of This is Not My Life. Shannon wrote her book Through the Glass about the life upheaval after husband confessed to the sexual assault and kidnapping of two women. Both Diane and Shannon have rich stories from which our community can learn so much! Diane and Shannon are pictured with Sarah Anderson, event organizer and facilitator from the Crime Prevention Council.

Prisons, Justice & Love: Nov. 3 Author Event – Media Release

Posted on: October 19th, 2016 By: Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council

Waterloo Region – The Friends of Crime Prevention network is hosting an evening with Diane Schoemperlen, author of This Is Not My Life on Thursday, November 3, 2016. This book recounts the story of her long-term relationship with a prison inmate and covers tough issues related to root causes of crime, such as family violence, sexual violence and problematic substance use.

This is not my Life is the first book selection in the Turn the Page Book Club – a community reading project initiated by Friends of Crime Prevention – to get people thinking and talking about justice, stigma and creating safe communities.

Join us for an evening with the author Diane Schoemperlen:

Thursday, November 3, 2016

7:00 pm – 9:00 pm    

Fresh Ground Café, 256 King St. East, Kitchener

Mike Farwell will facilitate a panel discussion about justice, institutionalization and preventing emotional abuse.

 

About Friends of Crime Prevention

Friends of Crime Prevention is a growing network of community members dedicated to advancing the work of crime prevention through social development.

 

About the Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council

The Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council advances ideas and actions that alleviate root causes of crime and improve social well-being. As a community collaborative it engages and connects citizens, decision makers, and service providers in order to reduce crime, victimization and fear of crime.

 

For more information, please contact:

 Sarah Anderson, Community Engagement Coordinator

Tel:   519-575-4400 Ext. 3548

Email:  sanderson@regionofwaterloo.ca

www.PeventingCrime.ca

Human Library ‘Books’ to Check Out at Friends of Crime Prevention

Posted on: November 3rd, 2015 By: Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council

As we put the finishing touches on the Friends of Crime Prevention Human Library event, we wanted to share some of the human ‘books’ and ‘library subjects’ you will find that day! Such a rich diversity of experience, knowledge and community change! You will have to use your time wisely to visit even three of these fantastic books.

On poverty/inequality:

On problematic substance use:

On neighbourhood environments:

On family environments:

On mental health:

On housing: 

On youth support & engagement:

What a collection!

Friday November 13, 2015
School of Social Work, Lyle Hallman Building
120 Duke Street West, Kitchener

(paid parking available at Kitchener City Hall. Entrance on Young Street, just across the street from the School of Social Work)

9:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Join us at 8:30 a.m. for our famous coffee social!

 

Friends of Crime Prevention Human Library: The Root Causes of Crime Edition

Posted on: October 31st, 2015 By: Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council

If you had the chance…. What questions would you ask from long time community leaders and pioneers in the field of crime prevention in Waterloo Region?

Don’t miss your opportunity with the Friends of Crime Prevention Root Causes of Crime Human Library!

Friday November 13, 2015
School of Social Work, Lyle Hallman Building
120 Duke Street West, Kitchener

9:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Join us at 8:30 a.m. for our famous coffee social!

Preview the list of “subjects” you can check out at the event – what a collection!


This year, 2015, marks the 20th Anniversary of the Waterloo Region Crime Prevention and 20 years of prevention-based thinking about crime prevention through social development.

At our Friends of Crime Prevention event on Friday November 13th, we take a look back at how we and our community have evolved, adapted and lead the way for change on the root causes of crime as a community in Waterloo Region.

In 1996, WRCPC developed The Root Causes of Crime statement as a way to promote a better understanding of the root causes, as complex and interrelated as they are. Earlier this year, WRCPC consulted with our community to guide the development of our 2015 – 2018 strategic plan. We learned that people generally understand the root causes of crime and victimization – which is amazing! The conditions we knew to contribute to crime 20 years ago were identified again today as priority root cause areas in need of focused attention. These include:

  • poverty/inequality
  • problematic substance use
  • neighbourhood environments
  • family environments
  • mental health
  • lack of housing
  • lack of supports & engagement for youth

Join your fellow Friends of Crime Prevention for this chance to ‘check out’ and ask questions of our ‘human library books’. Find out what is happening in our community to address these root cause issues, what organizations are involved in the work, what the issues and solutions might be and discover potential opportunities for Friends to get involved!

For more information, contact:
Juanita Metzger 519.575.4400 ext. 3548

OCT 22: Justice Dinner

Posted on: September 1st, 2015 By: Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council

 

Justice Dinner graphic

Join us in celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council as we take a trip back to the future!

Our Justice Dinner will be held October 22 at 5:30 pm at the Crowne Plaza, Kitchener. Six inspiring community champions will share how they achieved a shared community vision for crime prevention.  Speakers include:

Retired Police Chief Larry Gravill

Bryan Larkin, WRPS Chief of Police

Peter Ringrose, (Retired) Family & Children’s Services

Alison Scott, Family & Children’s Services

D’Arcy Farlow, Neighbourhood & Youth Engagement

Rohan Thompson, Neighbourhood & Youth Engagement

Tickets are $50.00 each (includes meal) and are available online (click here).

 

Sept 24: School Say Hi Day

Posted on: September 1st, 2015 By: Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council

HI-ST DOMINIC group

What a great way to welcome students to a new school year!

Our 9th Annual School Say Hi Day will take place on Thursday, September 24 at elementary and secondary schools across Waterloo Region.

By saying Hi students will get to know one another, break down barriers, become more inclusive and understanding of each other.  This day supports many anti-bulling, diversity & inclusion and community building activities you may already be doing at your school.

Register for Say Hi Day and you could win $500 for your school!  Learn more here!

SAY HI BANNER

SEPT 10: Prevention, Prisons & Popcorn

Posted on: July 6th, 2015 By: Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council

Film and Forum Evening with Howard Sapers

Thursday, September 10, 2015 ~  6:30 pm – 9:00 pm Kitchener Public Library, 85 Queen St. N., Kitchener

Over the past 5 years, Canadians have witnessed dramatic changes to the criminal justice system during an era of declining crime rates. The “Safe Streets Act” (Bill C-10) and subsequent legislation ushered in sweeping tough on crime measures. Across Canada, profound financial, social and health impacts are expected. Do we understand what this shift in policy means?

Join us for an evening with one of Canada’s most respected correctional experts, Howard Sapers, Correctional Investigator for Canada. The evening also includes a special screening of the Canadian film “State of Incarceration” followed by a community discussion.

This is a rare opportunity to hear from one of Canada’s foremost experts on corrections, policy and criminal justice in Canada.

6:30pm – Welcome & Introductions

6:45pm – Film: “State of Incarceration”

7:30pm – Keynote: Howard Sapers

8:00pm – Community Discussion

Film – State of Incarceration (CBC, 2014) Canada’s crime rate is at its lowest point in more than forty years. So why are we spending hundreds of millions of dollars to get tough on crime now? More prisons cells, tougher laws for parole, more mandatory minimum sentences are all now part of Canada’s high-cost justice system – and they are all ideas that failed in the United States. Our criminal justice system is currently undergoing a radical rethink. This documentary looks at where our criminal justice system is headed.

Free event. Register through the Kitchener Public Library.

Making Progress

Posted on: April 15th, 2011 By: Smart on Crime

Here at the Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council, we recently hosted our annual working retreat on Friday April 1st. Our theme? “Thinking, acting and changing like a movement”. And did we ever!

 

2010 Retreat with Centre for Social Innovation

You might recall that during our community consultation in 2009, community members told us they didn’t know how to be involved in the work of crime prevention other than to be at the Council table. With a Council table of 40+ members, and growing, we came to the realization that this would be unsustainable and not conducive to supporting a more community based movement for social change oriented crime prevention. We very quickly developed a plan to review, revise and restructure the way we operate in order to broaden the opportunities for anyone, from the grassroots to the highest levels of decision making, to become involved in the work of crime prevention through social development.

This work at our retreat day was significant in helping us make progress on our Smart on Crime Priority Direction for Organizational Design. We were able to reflect on the specific characteristics of networks that fit for the way we need to work and created several achievable action steps that can be taken by our network in the next year in order to realize the characteristics.

Our facilitator, Eli Malinsky, of the Centre for Social Innovation in Toronto, designed a day of exercises and thoughtful reflection to help us think beyond being just a network of 40 connected organizations to a more community based movement.

Our work with Eli was also heavily influenced by an article from the Stanford Social Innovation Review called Collective Impact and we will continue our exploration over the next year, of systemic approaches that coordinate action across our community.

Eli also wrote about his reflections and insights on our work together. They can be found here. If you are interested in similar work from the Centre for Social Innovation, you might want to check out their Sandbox workshop series.

Community Consultation 2009 – What We Did and What We Heard

Posted on: December 23rd, 2010 By: Smart on Crime

How we got here…

In December 2008, Council approved a broad community consultation approach to gather feedback from Council members, its partners and affiliated organizations and the general public regarding CPC’s work, how we might do its work better or differently and how we might get there.  The consultation process took place over 5 months in late 2009 and early 2010. We engaged participants through an online survey and focus groups. Focus groups were held with staff, volunteers and clients of WRCPC partner agencies. Participants ranged from municipal advisory committees, community and neighbourhoods groups, youth, service groups representing families and children, mental health, housing and homelessness, women’s crisis services, community justice, corrections, policing and rural communities. Over 175 people participated in 18 focus group sessions and over 500 responded to our online survey.  

2010 Survey Results

In February 2010, WRCPC’s Facilitating Committee, Alumni group, Community Relations Committee and CPC staff participated in a working session to work on the initial analysis of the survey and focus group data. We worked with Jo Nelson and Aziz , facilitators from ICA Associates, to identify broad themes present in the consultation information.

2010 Retreat Dotmocracy

At the WRCPC annual retreat, Council approved the new priority directions for the 2010 – 2014 plan.

The following section makes recommendations for the Priority Directions that would form the basis of the 2010 – 2014 Future Plan.

Recommendation 1

• To revise the 2003 Strategic Direction “Public Engagement” to become Priority Direction “Education & Learning”

Rationale: this is critical to any initiative that has a prevention mandate. This direction must include a component of learning so that education is rooted in evidence based knowledge and practice. Council must always be engaged in the reciprocal learning process in order to stay current, connected to the grassroots and focused on sustainable social & community change.

Recommendation 2

• To establish a new Priority Direction for “Research”

Rationale: CPC has become recognized for developing high quality research. The Violence Prevention Plan forms a large part of the research agenda at the current time. There is a desire from the community to see additional research available through the CPC.

Recommendation 3

• To revise the 2003 Strategic Direction “Focused Problem Solving to become Priority Direction “Leadership for Social Change”

Rationale: WRCPC is being asked to provide strategic leadership for building momentum and engaging appropriate actors that together, will lead a social and community change process to enhance our collective capacity to increase protective factors and decrease risk factors associated with crime, victimization and fear of crime.

While WRCPC will continue to be involved in problem solving efforts with respect to crime prevention, many partner and affiliated organizations felt this direction from the 2003 Business Plan was too easily confused with direct service which is the work of our partners. Some of the goal statements from the original 2003 Business Plan are still relevant and may be integrated as part of this new Priority Direction.

Recommendation 4

• To establish a new Priority Direction for Organizational Development

Rationale: WRCPC is actively engaged in development activities and capacity building initiatives to ensure that we can effectively support and lead the proposed Future Plan.

Recommendation 5

• To incorporate the Strategic Direction “Partnership Building” as a core principle of the way we work rather than a Strategic Direction

Rationale: Partnership building has become Council’s standard way of working over the last eight years. While some of the goal statements from the 2003 Business Plan are still relevant and may be assumed or revised under the new Priority Directions, partnership building, per se, is no longer warranted as a direction in and of itself. Partnership and collaboration are recognized as a means of accomplishing the work of the crime prevention through social development.

What we heard, in a nutshell…

The Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council is seen as an important and valuable community asset which is very much needed. We were encouraged to develop a healthy Future Plan that builds on the strengths of the community & WRCPC to affect social change.

WRCPC is viewed as a leader of crime prevention initiatives on many levels. The community is looking to WRCPC for this continued leadership. However, it’s easy to stretch this leadership too thin if or when we attempt to ‘be everything to everyone’. In a small community based organization, this ‘everything to everyone’ approach usually results in the following:

  • a loss of a clear organizational focus,
  • an emphasis on reactive response rather than proactive action,
  • outcomes that may have a diluted impact.
  • less effective use of resources

The community identified these issues starting to arise for the Crime Prevention Council. As a result, Council was asked to “work smarter”, “more focused” and with an emphasis on “depth over breadth” rather than simply “work harder” and “do more with less”.

We also learned a lot of important things from the community, such as:

  • a Crime Prevention Council is still relevant and an important part of our community
  • we must be ready to adapt to the changing needs of our community – and the community has changed!
  • we heard that WRCPC is doing great work and that more people across Waterloo Region should know about this business of crime prevention through social development. Many of our initiatives are well known – Say Hi campaign, In the Mind’s Eye Film + Forum event – but the community didn’t know these were WRCPC initiatives. The community encouraged us to be bold in taking credit for the work that we do
  • the community also suggested that we provide more clarity on the message of crime prevention and the role that we play

Lastly, the community consultation also affirmed the various roles that CPC undertakes in order to accomplish our work. These roles were articulated in the 2003 Business Plan and they include:

  • Catalyst
  • Resource
  • Educator
  • Connector
  • Advocate